The Integral Role of the Electronic Health Record and Tracking Software in the Implementation of Lung Cancer Screening—A Call to Action to Developers

A White Paper From the National Lung Cancer Roundtable
Published:December 23, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chest.2019.12.004
      The development of a high-quality lung cancer screening (LCS) program poses many operational challenges. Compared with criteria for other cancer screening target populations, the criteria for LCS eligibility are more complex, including age, smoking history, and general health status. Furthermore, among Medicare-eligible adults who qualify for LCS, which is a substantial proportion of the target population, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has regulatory mandates that apply to the screening process and must be met for reimbursement. Integrated LCS tracking software and tools within the electronic health record (EHR) that can capture, manage, and store data, as well as assist with the performance of specific LCS-related tasks, could contribute to addressing these challenges and accelerate the adoption of LCS. Currently, variations in EHR and tracking system capabilities, inadequate programmatic resources to manage the required data collection and reporting, and gaps in knowledge present hurdles to optimal program implementation.

      Key Words

      Abbreviations:

      CMS ( Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services), EHR ( electronic health record), IT ( Information Technology), LCS ( lung cancer screening), LDCT ( low-dose CT)
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