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Diaphragmatic Flutter Presenting as Inspiratory Stridor

  • Peter J. Cvietusa
    Affiliations
    From the Division of Allergy/Immunology, Departments of Pediatrics, National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, and University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver
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  • Sai R. Nimmagadda
    Affiliations
    From the Division of Allergy/Immunology, Departments of Pediatrics, National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, and University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver
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  • Raymond Wood
    Affiliations
    From the Division of Allergy/Immunology, Departments of Pediatrics, National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, and University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver
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  • Andrew H. Liu
    Correspondence
    Reprint requests: Dr. Liu, National Jewish Center, 1400 Jackson Street (K926) Denver, CO 80206
    Affiliations
    From the Division of Allergy/Immunology, Departments of Pediatrics, National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, and University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver
    Search for articles by this author
      Diaphragmatic flutter is a rarely reported disorder in which the diaphragm involuntarily contracts at a rapid rate. We report a unique case in which diaphragmatic flutter was associated with inspiratory stridor and was severely disabling. A new approach to the treatment of this condition, phrenic nerve crush, provided an optimal outcome, with resolution of symptoms and the return of normal diaphragmatic function. Pathophysiology and treatment of this condition are discussed.

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